When your world changes

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When you are full, you will refuse honey, but when you are hungry, even bitter food tastes sweet.

It has often happened that men have been so luxuriously fed that appetite has departed from them altogether. The Israelites when they were in the wilderness became at last so squeamish that though they were fed with the bread of heaven, and for once men did eat angels’ food, yet they said, “Our soul loatheth this light bread;” and thousands in the world are in great danger of falling into the same condition, for the rarest luxuries are unenjoyed by them. They pick and choose as if nothing were good enough for them, and like the old Roman gluttons they require sea and land, earth and air to be ransacked for their gratification, and then crave pungent sauces and strange flavourings ere they can eat. The fact is, the old proverb is true, that the best sauce for meat is hunger, and while the confectioner and the cook may labor with a thousand arts to produce a dainty dish, nature teaches us the way to enjoy our meat; namely, not to eat it till we want it, and then to partake of only so much as our bodies require. That hunger gives a relish even to objectionable diet is certain. Our forefathers found it possible to live upon food which we could not touch. Even so late as the reign of Queen Elizabeth, the mass of the poor seldom tasted wheaten bread but fed on rye or barley cakes, and often had to be content with bread made of beans, peas, tares, oats, or lentils, and even these had to be frequently mixed with acorns. They had a saying that “hunger setteth his foot in the horse’s manger,” meaning that food which was only fit for horses was devoured by men in the time of famine. Those delicate people who are for ever complaining of this and that and regretting the “good old times,” would change their tune if they had a trial of such fare, and could earnestly pray to be projected again into the times in which we live. – Spurgeon

Anyone away from home is like a bird away from its nest.

1. Like a bird on the deep, far away from its nest,
I had wandered, my Savior, from Thee,
But Thy dear loving voice called me home to Thy breast,
And I knew there was welcome for me.

Refrain
Welcome for me, Savior, from Thee;
A smile and a welcome for me;
Now, like a dove, I rest in Thy love,
And find a sweet refuge in Thee. – Fanny Crosby

Perfume and fragrant oils make you feel happier, but trouble shatters your peace of mind

 

 

 

These 10 Peter Drucker Quotes May Change Your World

 

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